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DCRBrown

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Oct 17 14 7:57 AM

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Just testing the water with removing Gone to Ground from Guns at Gettysburg Deluxe rules.

Gone to Ground was there to represent just that, when infantry under fire literally hit the dirt to take cover from in-coming fire.

However I'm starting to think that Unformed can also cover this situation. This means players have just one disorder status as opposed to the previous three (Unformed/Falter/Gone to Ground).

Any thoughts on this welcome.

DB
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#1 [url]

Oct 25 14 10:03 AM

Prefer to keep gone to ground

As I also see it as a tactical decision by the officers in face of the circumstances. Get down lads and out of harms way. Getting them back up is the hard part! Anything you do to simplify the unformed / faltering part of gag and GdB is a step in the right direction. So many little bits of the rules are impacted by it, simplifying it would be great.

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DCRBrown

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#2 [url]

Oct 26 14 9:04 AM

Des,


Thanks - after a few playtests I've decided to keep it - after all going to ground in one form or another seemed a common theme in many battles and missing from other rule sets, so its staying in!

DB 

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#3 [url]

Oct 26 14 4:18 PM

In a recent game using Guns at Gettysburg, there were three incidents where a unit was forced to Go to Ground. In all three incidents having the unit Go to Ground made perfect sense. In each incident, the unit had just received a devastating volley while in a fire fight. Units during the American Civil War (ACW) may have gone to ground, but continued fighting in similar situations. In two of the incidents, we had a hard time convincing the units to get up and continue fighting. The Go to Ground descriptor fit the status of the units.

In another incident, a regiment received a Falter result in its morale role to close during a charge. The unit had received several casualties from defensive fire and had suffered other casualties prior to charging. In this case, the unit may have been temporarily stunned and unwilling to close with the enemy. A Falter result as described in the rules was a good fit for this situation.

In other games we have played, units have become Unformed as a result of moving through severe terrain, as a result of melee, passing through or being passed through by another unit, and rallying from a retreat or rout. For these situations, Unformed is a good description of the unit’s current status.

The situations described produce different results in the effected unit. The current rules do a good job describing the current state of the unit for the different situations. Combining these three different results into Unformed may simplify the game and the rules, but in doing so loses some of the feel of the battle and time period the rule system is trying to create.

We have played numerous rules for battles in the Napoleonic, American War of Independence, ACW but we like the General de Brigade (GdB) family of rules best because of the feel of the battle and time period created by the rules. We may still play other rules when we want a faster game or for introducing a new player into horse and musket war gaming. There are less complex and faster playing rules, but those rules do not create the same feel for the time periods as the GdB family of rules.

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DCRBrown

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#4 [url]

Oct 27 14 11:00 AM

Milt,


A great response, thank you.

Certainly food for thought.  

One variant is to keep unformed pretty much as is, but merge Falter with Gone to Ground.  

To cover those instances where a unit goes to ground seemingly too close to the enemy for such a reaction to (such as within effective range of the enemy weaponry) they fall back out of this range bracket and then go to ground. Hopefully this will simplify matters but still keeps the period "feel".

DB

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